2 Big Opportunities for Incredible Change!

Recently, I had the opportunity to do an online session with my friend Ben Croft for the WBECS 2017 Summit. Ben is president of the World Business and Executive Coach Summit and founder of Ethical Coach and he asked me to talk about my pay it forward project 100 Coaches. I jumped at the chance to do this and I am excited to share the video webinar with you in this week’s blog.

In the webinar Ben and I talk about two ways to give back through coaching, and I want to share these with you so that you can dive into one of these chances to help others!

The first is the Ethical Coach program. The vision for Ethical Coach is to support 64,000 NGO, non-profit and children’s charity leaders each year in accessing coaching. The goal of each coaching engagement is to increase their organizational capacity so they can serve 100 extra children that wouldn’t otherwise have been possible if it were not for the coaching.

In the heart of successful coaching, there is the transformational belief that it is possible to make a positive impact. We excel in making endeavors stronger, more resilient, powerful, and of course, more successful.

Recognizing that global challenges bear down disproportionately on the most vulnerable, especially on children, has triggered an important call to action. How can coaching end extreme poverty, promote equality and protect the planet? Through the leadership of WBECS and the formation of Ethical Coach, a new vision is in place.

Ethical Coach bridges exclusive and effective coaching to the charities, not-for-profit organizations and social enterprises addressing the greatest humanitarian and environmental challenges of our time. Applying the tools of coaching to philanthropic efforts creates a platform to really change lives. Our goal is to empower leadership development, accountability, organizational capacity, and performance enhancement for 64,000 leaders a year, who can then extend their reach to an additional 100 children a year.

The Ethiopia Experience is one of the initial projects and begins January 2018 in Addis Ababa. Although Ethiopia is home to a network of organizations working to address extreme poverty and hunger, efforts are thwarted by the constraints of capacity. Ethical Coach will host 400 NGO leaders in workshops and deliver coaching skills through our high level international volunteer coaches. In addition, selections for the 2018 Coaching Grant will match pioneer Ethical Coaches to Ethiopian organizations. These case studies will then inform opportunities in other region around the world, as well as contribute new standards of practice.

‘When spiders unite, they can tie up a lion.’

Amharic Ethiopian proverb

If you would like to get involved or find out more about this amazing movement and be part of the solution, send us an email: ethicalcoach@wbecs.com

The second opportunity is my legacy project Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches. I came up with the idea a couple of years ago when I attended a program led by my wonderful friend Ayse Birsel called Design the Life You Love. At the program, Ayse asked us to write down our heroes. I wrote down Frances Hesselbein (former CEO of the Girl Scouts and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom), Alan Mulally (former CEO of Ford and CEO of the year in the United States), Peter Drucker (founder of modern management), Paul Hersey (noted author, teacher, and personal mentor of mine), and Warren Bennis (one of the world’s greatest leadership thinkers of his time). Then Ayse asked us to describe what made us think of them as heroes. I wrote “great teachers” and “very generous.” She then challenged us to “be more like them” in designing the lives we love.

It was from this fantastic program that I came up with the idea to teach 15 people everything I know at no charge. In return, these 15 would do the same thing for 15 others, for free. I was inspired to do this by the many great teachers and leaders who have so generously helped me – without ever asking for anything in return. It is my way of recognizing the amazing contributions they have made in my life.

I made a 30-second video about the project for LinkedIn. It ended up becoming one of the most widely viewed videos in the history of LinkedIn. I was amazed when more than 12,000 people applied for the 15 positions. I have been very humbled and inspired by this overwhelming response, and so I expanded the project to 100 Coaches and 100 Aspiring Coaches!

Our first cohort of 25 coaches has met twice and this past weekend our second cohort of 30 coaches met for the first time. At these meetings, we’ve learned from some of the greatest leaders of our time, Alan Mulally, Frances Hesselbein and Dr. Jim Kim, President of the World Bank, and where they were formally trained in Stakeholder Centered Coaching by Dr. Frank Wagner, Chris Coffey, and Will Linssen. I am very happy to say that the first 55 coaches are well on their way to paying it forward!

If you would like to apply to the Marshall Goldsmith Aspiring Coaches program, please go to http://www.marshallgoldsmith.com/application/. I look forward to receiving your application!

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How to Get Incredibly Helpful Feedback from Just About Anyone!

Feedback is very useful for telling us “where we are.” Without it, I couldn’t work with my clients. I wouldn’t know what the people around my client think about what he or she needs to change. Likewise, without feedback, we wouldn’t know if were getting better or worse. We all need feedback to see where we are, where we need to go, and to measure our progress along the way. And I have a foolproof method for securing it.

When I work with coaching clients, I always get confidential feedback from their coworkers at the beginning of the process. I enlist each person to help me out. I want them to assist, not sabotage, the change process. I do this by saying to them, “I’m going to be working with my client for the next year. I don’t get paid if she doesn’t get better. Better is not defined by me; it is not defined by her. It is defined by you and the other coworkers involved in the process.” I then present them with four requests. I ask them to commit to:

  1. Let go of the past.
  2. Tell the truth.
  3. Be supportive and helpful–not cynical or negative.
  4. Pick something to improve themselves, so everyone is focused on more “improving” than “judging.”

As you contemplate changing your behavior yourself, you will need to do this same thing with your colleagues. Pick about a dozen people with whom you’ve had professional contact–work friends, peers, colleagues–and ask them to agree to these four commitments. When they do, which they nearly always will, you are ready to begin soliciting feedback from them about yourself.

In my experience, there are a hundred wrong ways to ask for feedback and one right way. Most of us know the wrong ways. We ask people, “What do you think of me?” “How do you feel about me?” “What do you hate about me?” or “What do you like about me?” Think about your colleagues. How many of them are your friends? How many of them really want to express to you their “true” feelings about you, to you?

A better question (and in my opinion the only question that works) is, “How can I do better?” Variations based on circumstances are okay, such as “What can I do to be a better partner at home?” or “What can I do to be a better leader of the group?” You get the idea. Pure issue-free feedback that makes change possible has to a) solicit advice rather than criticism, b) be directed towards the future, and c) be couched in a way that suggests you are, in fact, going to try to do better.

Finally, when you get the answer, when someone gives you the gift of what you can do to be better, don’t respond with your opinion of their advice. It will just sound like denial, rationalization, and objection. Treat every piece of advice as a gift, a compliment, and simply say, “Thank you.” No one expects you to act on every piece of advice. Just act on advice that makes sense to you. The people around you will be thrilled!

Now I want to hear from you!

Do you solicit feedback? How do you go about it? What holds you back from asking for feedback? What holds you back from giving feedback? We all need honest, helpful, constructive feedback. It’s hard to find, so I’m counting on you to give me your ideas, reflections, and experiences with feedback. Let me know in the comments. I look forward to hearing from you!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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3 Tips for Leaders Who Engage on Social Media

Some relationships are permanent; examples can include our families, life partners, close friends, and professional colleagues. These are lifelong bonds we form with some people.

Other relationships are transient. Transient relationships with friends, acquaintances, coworkers and colleagues can be highly enriching or quickly forgotten and last for a few days or a few years, either way, they are temporary.

Today we have a new type of relationship – the virtual relationship. This type of relationships is quite new, relatively speaking. In virtual “relationships”, we form connections (note that they’re called “followers” or “friends” or, literally, “connections”) with electronic representations of people. We may see their photos and be able to read their words, but we don’t interact in the classic sense. For the most part, there is no body language, inflection, intonation, volume, pitch, nonverbal behavior, or gesticulation.

Social media does a lot of good in connecting people, empowering movements, and boosting worthy causes. But it presents challenges, too. We can see and experience language and reactions on social media that would never occur in person, such as trolls who attack others for no reason, gratuitous use of obscenity, polarizing opinions, name calling, and so forth. A flat medium permits that. Such behavior, if manifested in a face-to-face, public setting would be considered gross and coarse. People make political, sexual, and religious comments on social media that they would never utter in the actual presence of other people.

Consequently, as a leader, our third dimension of relationships—virtual—requires you to be very thoughtful when engaging for these three reasons:

  1. Nothing published on any social media platform, no matter how restrictive you are in setting your connection permissions, is ever private or actually restricted to that platform. There is a good chance that others will learn of your private views and no matter how wonderful they are, this can lead to trouble.
  2. There are attack dogs on social media platforms who are always on the prowl spoiling for a fight. Many of them are bullies with vast inferiority complexes (the hallmark of bullies) who are seeking to bring everyone down to their own levels of poor self-worth. Such fights can be enervating. You may want to cull your virtual connections for this reason.
  3. Social media platforms can turn into vast vanity publishing operations, allowing anyone to say almost anything. And what is said becomes indelible. We all leave a trail. It’s hard to erase things that have been posted in the past unless you delete your account entirely, which still isn’t foolproof. What you’ve published two years ago can return to haunt you next year.

Relationships, whether they are permanent, transient, or virtual, fuel your journey. Some are constant sources of power, some are present for certain intervals and provide guidance and help, and some should be avoided, ended, or minimized because they represent unwanted detours, excess weight, or distraction. With those distinctions in mind, it’s important to focus on relationships that help you sustain your journey, whether they be permanent or temporary or virtual.

Adapted from Lifestorming (Wiley, 2017) by Alan Weiss and Marshall Goldsmith

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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You’re a Leader – What Should You Tweet?

Social media has given us an incredible tool with which to reach millions and millions of people across the globe. With 7.5 billion people, and counting almost 2 billion on Facebook alone, as a leader, it is more important than ever to be thoughtful about what you post, tweet, and share.

So, how do you know what to “tweet”?

In the video interview that accompanies this blog, Todd Lombardo, digital marketer at Hastings Digital, recommends contemplating two questions when deciding what to share. These two questions are:

  1. What do you have to say? And,
  2. Do you offer value to the audience?

In my case, the first question, “What do I have to say?” has a simple answer. Everything I share on YouTube, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter is focused on my mission: helping successful leaders achieve positive lasting change in behavior, for themselves, their people, and their teams. I am the world’s expert on this one distinct thing. In fact, if you do a Google search for “helping successful leaders” (make sure you do this in quotes!), 450 of the first 500 hits are about me. I am not an expert on anything else, nor do I try to be. I have a very clear mission – Peter Drucker taught me the importance of this. He said, “Your mission should fit on a T-shirt.” This is so that it’s clear and easy to remember.

To the second question, “Does what I am sharing offer value to the audience?” Always, before sharing on social media I ask myself, “Will this help successful leaders achieve positive lasting change in behavior?” Does this content reinforce my positive mission? If the answer is yes, I share it; if it’s no, I edit, rewrite, or scrap the piece all together.

While my mission hasn’t changed in decades, where I find my audience has. In the past, I did three things: I’m an executive coach, a speaker or teacher, and an author.

Executive coaching has a very deep impact, however, I can reach only a tiny number of people. Realistically I can coach 10 -15 people at one time. With speaking and giving talks, I can reach far more people. It is of course limited to the size of the room. It is a different level of depth than coaching. It’s not as deep, and it is broader in reach. Broader still is the third thing I do, which is write and edit books and articles. This was how I reached most of my audience for many years. You may not know this, but more than 2 million people have read my books! With the Digital Age, I have added a fourth dimension – digital content creator. With online content, I can reach millions of people. The impact is not as deep, and yet for many people it makes a positive impact.

What hasn’t changed across any of these dimensions is my mission. I continue to “help successful leaders achieve positive lasting change in behavior, for themselves, their people, and their teams” in all of these areas.

What are your thoughts about social media? How do you choose what to share, post, and tweet? I’d love to hear your views in the comments!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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How to Avoid One of the Most Devastating Causes of Career Lag!

Our environment is full of triggers! Smells, sounds, sights barrage us constantly and can affect our actions in both our personal and professional lives. Some triggers are so powerful they can keep us from focusing on making meaningful change, and we unknowingly become a creation of the world around us rather than who we want to be.

In this digital age, the biggest trigger is the Internet and advent of very sophisticated online media in all its varied forms. While the Internet and social media can be very positive, for instance sharing research and information across the globe instantly, they can also take us completely off course and hinder our progress towards our goals. In other words, mindless Googling and Snapchatting can be significant causes of career lag!

How many times have you been at a restaurant and seen a couple sitting together looking only at their smart phones? We may be communicating or learning from social media or the Internet, but we’re not engaging with the people who are sitting across from us – we are disconnected from our environment and the people in it. As a result that relationship does not grow. How about when a favorite TV series of yours is added to Netflix or Hulu? A weekend of binging on your show keeps you from venturing out to be with your friends and family. And, it can keep you from doing things that help your career and expand your horizons.

About 20 or so years ago, I wrote an article and I predicted that media addiction would surpass drug and alcohol addiction combined as a social problem. Unfortunately, this prediction has come true. The average kid who flunks out of school spends an average of 55 hours a week on non-academic media. That’s an addiction. A young man I know who drives me back and forth to Dartmouth where I teach flunked out of college. He has spent 25,000 hours of his life playing World of Warcraft instead of going to school! That is an addiction. He could have earned two PhDs in 25,000 hours!

What happens is that many of us fall into something called the monkey mind. The monkey mind is a Buddhist Concept, which is the idea that our mind is like a monkey, swinging from vine to vine through the jungle or from thought to thought in our heads. Looking at it this way, the Internet is like amphetamines for the monkey mind.

For example, have you ever gone online and said, “I’m going to look up something. It should take me five minutes.” Three hours later, you’re still online and you don’t remember what you started to search for in the first place? This is the monkey mind. You click from picture to picture, story to story, and your mind swings like the monkey from vine to vine without any thought about what you’re doing or where you’re going. You are just swinging. Hours are lost, precious time is gone, and you have now used up any momentum you had for furthering your own growth and development.

How can you avoid this career killer?

I use the daily question process myself and I recommend it to all of my clients and students. It’s very simple. You get an Excel spreadsheet. Down one column, you list the behaviors that are most important in your life – job search, school, family, friends, exercise are often in this column. You list these as a series of questions. For instance, how many pushups did I do today? Did I call my mother today? How many hours did I spend on non-academic social media today? Every question has to be answered with a yes, no, or number. If the question is answered as a ‘yes,’ put a ‘one’ on the Excel sheet, ‘no’ is ‘zero,’ or use a number to answer such questions as, how many pushups did I do? Do this every day for at least two weeks. It takes two minutes a day and it will help you get better at almost anything—it’s amazing how well this works.

Some people might be skeptical, thinking two minutes a day will help me get better at almost anything sounds too good to be true, but half the people doing this, within two weeks, quit. And they don’t quit because it doesn’t work; they quit because it does work. Because even though this is very easy advice to understand, it’s very challenging to do. You have to look in the mirror every day and it can be painful to do that. I challenge you to try this. Let me know how it’s going, and if you’d like a copy of my questions, send me an email at marshall@marshallgoldsmith.com. This is a great discipline that takes two minutes a day and will help better than almost anything!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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Why Leaders Need Term Limits

Normally, successful people are highly committed to their work. Here is the problem: the more committed we are to a given path the harder it is for us to admit when it’s time to leave. This is why leaders need term limits – it is often just too difficult for them to set these for themselves.

I have had the privilege of working with more than 120 CEOs. I’ve also had the unfortunate privilege of working with four CEOs for whom it was time to leave. I said to them, “It is time to leave now. Leave with dignity. Don’t embarrass yourself.” I failed in all four cases. They didn’t leave, and a couple of them were on the covers of national magazines – embarrassing themselves and the company.

Why didn’t they leave when it was time to go? Because it is incredibly difficult for highly successful leaders, who have put their heart and soul into something, to look into the mirror and say, “This doesn’t work. It’s time to go.” The very fact that they are so highly committed to what they are doing makes it very hard for them to hear contrary information. This is true for leaders at all levels, not just the CEOs.

Almost every executive goes through this dialog as part of the challenge of letting go. This fear often results in postponement of the succession announcement until the last minute — and inhibits what could have been a much smoother transition process.

A smoother transition process looks something like this.

When it is approaching time to leave or move on to a new position, face reality — you will become a lame duck. Attention will immediately shift to your successor. Her vision for the future will mean more than yours. If you disapprove of executive team members’ ideas, they will just wait it out and resell the same ideas to your successor. People will start sucking up to her — in the same way they used to suck up to you. Make peace with being a lame duck before it actually happens and your life, your successor’s life, and the lives of your colleagues will be a lot better. Talk to your successor so you can leave them in a position to succeed. Being a lame duck doesn’t have to be all bad. Use this period to coach your successor (behind the scenes). Begin the transfer of power before you have to. Support your successor however you can. Build her confidence. Involve your successor in all important decisions and, to the degree humanly possible, make sure that she agrees with any of your announced strategies. Remember, she is the person who is going to have to live with them for the next few years – and make them work.

If you want to be a great lame duck, make those tough, unpopular decisions that you know are good for the company. Don’t worry about finishing on a great note. Be willing to make long term investments that may cost the company in the short run — but promise to produce desired results in the long run. Be more focused on putting your successor in a position where she will succeed, than finishing in a way that will make you look good.

Be a happy duck. Go home a little earlier. Spend some more time with the family you may have neglected in the past. Reacquaint yourself with your spouse.

My final advice is simple but often ignored—focus less on what you’re leaving and more on where you’re headed next.

Follow the 100 Coaches project at www.marshallgoldsmith.com/100-coaches, on TwitterFacebook, or right here on LinkedIn!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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5 Great Ways to Keep Your Superstars!

When giving feedback to your superstar performers, the key issue to recognize is that the “no news is good news” feedback approach is not an effective management technique for handling them.

Too often we assume that these individuals know how much we value their contributions and we take the lazy approach to providing feedback: “You know you’re doing a good job.” Or worse: “Write your own performance review and I’ll sign it.” Sound familiar?

Here are some quick tips to more effectively discuss performance — and motivate — your top talent:

  1. Approach the discussion with the same preparation and attention to detail that you focus on team members with problem or growth opportunities. If they truly are valued by you and the organization, give them the thoughtfulness, respect, and time that they deserve.
  2. Recognize that the quickest way to encourage a top performer to start looking for a job elsewhere is to tell them: “there is nothing that you need to work on.” Based on our database of over 4 million leaders, the highest ranked behavior of our top performers is a commitment to self-improvement. These people want — and need — to learn and grow. Help them identify opportunities.
  3. Specify the value that these performers bring to you and to the organization. Express the cause and effect of their contributions/role in the organization and the appreciation that you personally feel.
  4. Be as honest as possible about future opportunities within the organization. Don’t commit beyond your span of control. It is better to be candid and maintain trust than to have these individuals’ base decisions on deals that you cannot keep.
  5. Recognize that as their leader, you have the greatest ability to retain these human assets. The number one factor that influences people’s intent to stay or leave a job is their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with their leader – so keep them challenged; provide them with ongoing feedback; and recognize/express your appreciation for their contributions.

Most importantly, recognize that you will have the most impact on their continued growth and satisfaction.

Follow the 100 Coaches project at www.marshallgoldsmith.com/100coaches, on TwitterFacebook, or right here on LinkedIn!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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Six Things Positive People Say in Adversity!

Today, with all of the pressures of life and work, we’re busier and working harder than we ever have. Sometimes life can be difficult, things happen that we don’t like, and we get down. This is just a fact!

My wonderful friend Frances Hesselbein (former CEO of the Girl Scouts and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom) has a saying that I love. She says, when asked what her blood type is, “Be Positive!” This is her philosophy and it helps her navigate through challenges in a positive way.

I love her outlook and I look for it in others as I travel around the world. How do people meet challenges and view change in a positive way? Here are some of the comments I’ve heard from friends, leaders, and students about how to view and manage difficulties in a positive and constructive way.

  1. “There is no use dwelling on the past. What is done is done. In hindsight, would I have done some things differently? Of course! I cannot change that now. I am focused on creating a great future.”
  2. “In a strange way, my recent ‘disasters’ have actually made me better. I now realize that what matters is my health, friends, and family. I am grateful for the fact that I now understand what really matters.”
  3. “I have a good job. I used to gripe about all kinds of minor annoyances at work. I recognize now that there are a lot of people out there who are much worse off than I am. All the little things that bothered me so much don’t matter anymore.”
  4. “I have time to invest in my future. I am using it to do what I always said I wanted to do. I am glad that I have a chance to do this.”
  5. “I love my work. As an independent contractor, I have had to cut my fees. Who cares? I still love what I am doing and am grateful to be doing what I love.”
  6. “My family is closer than ever. Some of us aren’t doing so well. We are doing whatever we can to help each other. We love each other and support each other when times are tough.”

Personally, I’m very grateful to have the opportunity to communicate with you, my readers. Many of you have sent me wonderful comments and e-mails. I have learned so much from you, and I am very appreciative for your interest in what I write.

“Great is the need of the student to learn — far greater is the need of the teacher to teach.” As a teacher, trying to help you — even a little — adds value to my life. Thank you!

Follow the 100 Coaches project at www.marshallgoldsmith.com/100-coaches, on TwitterFacebook, or right here on LinkedIn!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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Meet My Next Group of Coaches!

 Dear Friends,

Greetings from Seattle!

The Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches ‘pay it forward’ project is officially in full swing, and I am excited to announce the next cohort of coaches who will join me in Phoenix in June!

For those of you who haven’t heard of the project, here is a little back story.

A couple of years ago, I attended a program led by my wonderful friend Ayse Birsel called Design the Life You Love. At the program, Ayse asked us to write down our heroes. I wrote down Frances Hesselbein (former CEO of the Girl Scouts and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom), Alan Mulally (former CEO of Ford and CEO of the year in the United States), Peter Drucker (founder of modern management), Paul Hersey (noted author, teacher, and personal mentor of mine), and Warren Bennis (one of the world’s greatest leadership thinkers of his time). Then Ayse asked us to describe what made us think of them as heroes. I wrote “great teachers” and “very generous.” She then challenged us to “be more like them” in designing the lives we love.

It was from this fantastic program that I came up with the idea to teach 15 people everything I know at no charge. In return, these 15 would do the same thing for 15 others, for free. I was inspired to do this by the many great teachers and leaders who have so generously helped me – without ever asking for anything in return. It is my way of recognizing the amazing contributions they have made in my life.

I made a 30-second video about the project for LinkedIn. It ended up becoming one of the most widely viewed videos in the history of LinkedIn. I was amazed when more than 12,000 people applied for the 15 positions. I have been very humbled and inspired by this overwhelming response, and so I expanded the project to 100 Coaches and now 100 Aspiring Coaches!

Our first cohort of 25 coaches has met twice. First in December 2016 in Phoenix where they learned from Alan Mulally as well as me. And more recently in New York City where we spent two days with two of the greatest leaders of our time, Frances Hesselbein and Dr. Jim Kim, President of the World Bank, and where they were formally trained in Stakeholder Centered Coaching by Dr. Frank Wagner, Chris Coffey, and Will Linssen. This first cohort is well on their way to sharing their new insights with the world!

It is time now to announce the second cohort. This diverse group of coaches are some of the top people in their fields and will come from around the world to join me in Phoenix June 23-25!

Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches

Thought Leaders – Cohort 1

Alexander Osterwalder – Thinkers 50 #1 Strategy Thinker 2015-17, million-selling author Business Model Generation and Value Proposition Design, inventor Business Model Canvas

Whitney Johnson – Thinkers 50 award-winning Management Thinker 2015-17, Disruptive Innovation expert, author Disrupt Yourself: Putting the Power of Disruptive Innovation to Work

Pawel Motyl – Formerly CEO Harvard Business Review Poland, noted speaker, consultant and executive coach, author Labirynt Sztuka podejmowania decyzji

Ayse Birsel – One of the Inc. Magazine top 15 designers in the world, author of Design the Life You Love: A Step-by-Step Guide to Building a Meaningful Future

Thought Leaders – Cohort 2

Herminia Ibarra – Thinkers 50 #8 Management Thinker 2015-17, #1 Leadership Thinker 2013-15, Professor at London Business School, former professor Harvard, best-selling author of Working Identity: Unconventional Strategies for Reinventing Your Career

Liz Wiseman – Bestselling author of Multipliers, Thinkers 50 Top Ten Leadership Thinker 2015-17, Winner of the ATD Champion of Talent Award

Keith Ferrazzi – #1 bestselling author of Never Eat Alone and Whose Got Your Back, expert in strategic consulting and training to increase sales and performance, formerly CMO Starwood Hotels and Deloitte

Harry Kraemer – Former CEO Baxter, Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management Professor of the Year, author of From Values to Action and Becoming the Best

Mark Thompson – World’s #1 Executive Coach for Growth Company Leaders; NY Times bestselling author Admired and Success Built to Last; Stanford University Venture Design Lab; Executive Producer, Schwab.com, and Forbes’ Venture Investor with the Midas Touch

Price Pritchett – Bestselling author of 26 books which have sold more than 10 million copies, pioneering thought leader on merger integration strategy, corporate culture, innovation and organizational change

Srikumar Rao – Developer of one of the most popular courses ever taught at top business schools (Kellogg Northwestern, Columbia University, UC Berkeley, London Business School), author Are You Ready to Succeed? and Happiness at Work

Erica Dhawan – Bestselling author of Get Big Things Done: The Power of Connectional Intelligence, MPA Harvard Kennedy School and MBA MIT

University Representatives—Cohort 1

General Bernie Banks – Former General US Army, head of Leadership Development West Point, currently Associate Dean Northwestern Kellogg School of Management

Carol Kauffman – Founder/Executive Institute of Coaching Harvard, chief supervisor Meyler Campbell Business Coaching Program

Praveen Kopalle – Professor Dartmouth Tuck School, head of Tuck coaching program for MBAs

Sanyin Siang – Executive Director Coach K Center on Leadership & Ethics (COLE), laboratory for leadership, Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business

Clark Callahan – Managing Director, Custom Programs, Harvard Business School Executive Education

University Representatives—Cohort 2

Annie McKee – Director University of Pennsylvania – Penn CLO Ph.D. program, author, and coach

General Thomas Kolditz – Founding Director Doerr Institute Rice University, formerly head of Leadership Development West Point

Paul Corona –Director of Full-Time MBA Leadership Development, Kellogg School of Management Northwestern University

Sergey Sirotenko – Associate executive coach INSEAD; consultant Ward Howell (Moscow); Big Brothers Big Sisters board member; formerly Leadership Development Director, Yale University, and Member of Global Agenda Council on Russia with the World Economic Forum in Davos

Col. Diane Ryan – Academy Professor and Director Leadership Development at US Military Academy, Professor Dept. Behavior Sciences

External Coaches—Cohort 1

David Peterson – Pioneer executive coach, head of coaching at Google, author Development FIRST and Leader as Coach

Judith Glaser – Top executive coach, speaker, noted author Conversational Intelligence, Creating WE: Change I-Thinking to We-Thinking & Build a Healthy Thriving Organization, and The DNA of Leadership

Michael Bungay Stanier – #2 ranked executive coach, speaker, award-winning author Do More Great Work and The Coaching Habit

Doug Winnie – ActionCOACH #1 small business coach 2016

Everett Alexander – Start up and family business coach, financial advisor, MS and MBA University of Pennsylvania

External Coaches—Cohort 2

Dr. Peter Chee – CEO ITD World (China), author, top coach in Asia

Peter Bregman – Wall Street Journal bestselling author 18 Minutes: Find Your Focus, Master Distraction, personal productivity expert

Edy Greenblatt – Pioneering expert on resilience, coach supervisor, award-winning author, faculty and coaching director DeSautels Centre for Integrative Thinking, University of Toronto

Alisa Cohn – Executive coach for CEOs, emerging leaders, and entrepreneurs, ranked Boston top 10 coaches, Cornell University Entrepreneurship Advisory Board, faculty of Cornell Tech

Divya Silbermann – Executive coach for startup and new business leaders, leadership coach, and former HR leader at Facebook

Bryan Miller  Larry H. Miller Group of Companies Board of Directors & Executive Director of Culture, speaker, author, trainer, coach, specializes in family business

Human Resources & Leadership Development Professionals—Cohort 1

Kathleen Wilson-Thompson – Executive Vice President and Global Chief Human Resources Officer HR Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc., top-level internal coaching to executives

Prakash Raman – Senior consultant leadership development LinkedIn, coach, facilitator, and leadership development expert

Human Resources & Leadership Development Professionals—Cohort 2

Laine Joelson Cohen – Director of Leadership and Professional Development, CitiCorp, faculty of CitiCorp Senior Leadership Program and NYU Professional Studies, coach

Patricia Gorton – Director Leadership and Talent Management DTCC, former senior vice president CitiCorp, MBA University of Michigan

Deanne Kissinger – Global Director Learning and Leadership Development Sealed Air Corporation, MBA Melbourne School, Australia, internal leadership development specialist

Jasmin Thomson – Head of Leadership Development at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, organizational and effectiveness consultant, facilitator, and coach, PhD organizational behavior

Organizational Leaders Cohort—1

Aicha Evans – Senior Vice President and General Manager at Intel Corporation, Fortune Magazine—top future women leaders in America

Deborah Borg – Chief Human Resource Officer Bunge Limited, former division president Dow USA, passionate about the human dimension of business and leadership in support of the business agenda

Bill Simpson – President and CEO Hershey Entertainment and Resorts Company, dedicated to the greater mission of providing value to the Milton Hershey School and home for children

Garry Ridge – CEO WD40, author Helping People Win at Work: A Business Philosophy Called “Don’t Mark My Paper, Help Me Get an A”

Pooneh Mohajer – Inc. Magazine nominee, co-founder and CEO TokiDoki, co-founder Hard Candy, visionary entrepreneur

Feyzi Fatehi – Inc. Magazine nominee, founder and CEO, Corent Technologies, author The 10x Innovation Revolution: Inspiring a Culture of Disruption and Entrepreneurship Within Any Organization

Gabriela Teasdale – President at Fundación Transformación Paraguay, top leadership speaker and coach

Asheesh Advani – CEO Junior Achievement Worldwide, author Investors in Your Backyard: How to Raise Business Capital from the People You Know and Business Loans from Family & Friends: How to Ask, Make It Legal & Make It Work

Organizational Leaders—Cohort 2

Eric Schurenberg – President and Editor in Chief – Inc. Magazine, mission is to educate entrepreneurs

Jim Citrin – World’s #1 professional in executive search, author, teacher, thinker

Brown Johnson – Executive Producer and Creative Director Sesame Street

Paul Hill – Former Director of Mission Control NASA, author, and coach

Mike Sursock – Head of Operations Group at Baring Private Equity Asia

Kevin Koch – President and CEO of Koch, Inc., 2017 Campaign Chair United Way of Southwestern Indiana

Telisa Yancy – Executive vice president and champion of customers, employees, growth, and innovation for American Family Insurance

Rob Nail – CEO & Associate Founder of Singularity University, start up leader

We began with 25 fantastic people. I have loved spending time with each and every one of them. I am very honored that Alan Mulally, Frances Hesselbein, Dr. Jim Kim, Hubert Joly (CEO of Best Buy), and Liz Smith (CEO of Bloomin’ Brands) have generously agreed to help lead this effort.

I would also like to thank Sarah McArthur, chief operating officer of the project, and advisors to the project Taavo Godtfredsen and Scott Osman for providing the professional support needed for such a large-scale effort.

Now, we have 30 new members of our 100 Coaches project who I’ll meet with in June and, I still have 45 coaches to select in the coming months!

As I have read your comments online, the feedback on the 100 Coaches project has been incredibly positive. One of the great suggestions I have received is that all of the MG100 have fantastic backgrounds in leadership, education, and coaching, but what about people who haven’t had some of these opportunities? This gave me pause for thought, so, I came up with an idea. I’ve decided to form a second group of 100 Aspiring Coaches next year who will learn from me and the first 100 coaches! If you are interested, please apply at MarshallGoldsmith.com. If you’ve already applied for 100 Coaches, you do not need to reapply.

And, finally, this has been one of the most wonderful projects of my life. I have been honored to work with the first 25 coaches and I am really looking forward to meeting the second cadre of coaches in June!

Now, I’d like to leave you with a challenge. What are some of the ways you can give back? How might you give to others so that eventually they can give back to even more people?

Life is good.

Marshall

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The Most Unusual Investment System with Benefits a 1000-Fold!

What’s the most unusual investment system that will reap you benefits of a thousand fold?

For me it’s been giving all of my material away on my website. You can copy, share, download, and duplicate it, it’s all free. I’ve been amazed at how many wonderful people I have met and wonderful experiences I have had because I do this. It’s more than I ever could have imagined!

I started doing this when I was young. I didn’t know what I was doing, it just came naturally. Where I grew up in Kentucky, there was a program called the March of Dimes Bread Drive. My high school was one of the poorer schools in the area, and I was put in charge of the bread drive for my area. We would have been predicted to come in near last place. Instead we can in first place!

We were instructed to knock on doors in our neighborhood. When someone answered the door, we were to ask them, “Would you make a donation?” If the person made a donation, then we were to give them a loaf of bread.

I told my team, “We’re going to do something different. We’re going to give them the bread. At the end of the day, the bread will be thrown away in any case. If they are too poor to make a donation – let’s just give them the bread.” Then we’ll tell them, “If you want or are able to make a donation that would be nice, if not that’s okay too. Either way, we’re going to give you the loaf of bread.”

You see, to me, it was demeaning to try to bribe someone with a loaf of bread. If they can give you something back for it, great. But, maybe they can’t right then, maybe they can’t afford it, maybe they aren’t capable of it. That’s okay too.

It was during that March of Dimes Bread Drive that I really started to live the philosophy of giving.

It’s been a good philosophy of life for me to just “give people the bread.” And, in Valley Station, Kentucky those many years ago, that is how my little March of Dimes Bread Drive team ended up raising more money than any other team in the county!

Today, I’m giving the bread away again with my legacy project 100 Coaches, which I initiated last year. I am teaching 100 people everything I know at no charge. In return, these 100 have committed to do the same thing for 100 others, for free. I was inspired to do this by the many great teachers and leaders who have so generously helped me – without ever asking for anything in return. It is my way of recognizing the amazing contributions they have made in my life.

Our first cohort of 25 coaches has already met twice and learned from some of the greatest leaders of our time, Alan Mulally (former CEO of Ford and CEO of the year in the United States), Frances Hesselbein (former CEO of the Girl Scouts and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom), and Dr. Jim Kim (President of the World Bank). They are well on their way to sharing their new insights with the world!

And, now, I’ve just announced the second cohort! I am so excited to meet with this diverse group of coaches who will come from around the world to join me in Phoenix June 23-25!

Follow the #100Coaches project at www.marshallgoldsmith.com/100-coaches, on TwitterFacebook, or right here on LinkedIn!

Triggers is a #1 New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller! Order it at Amazon. See The Marshall Goldsmith Thinkers50 Video Blog for more of this video series.

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