Why Follow Up Matters

Chester Elton is one of today’s most influential voices in workplace trends. He is a #1 bestselling author of the books, All In, The Carrot Principle, and The Best Team Wins,which have sold more than 1.5 million copies worldwide. Chester is also my great friend, a member of our 100 Coaches organization, and during our interview series, Chester will provide us with solutions to leaders looking to manage change, drive innovation, and lead a multi-generational workforce.

In this week’s interview, Chester shares with us his personal experience with why following up with others matters when we are trying to change our “bad habits”. Below is an excerpt from our interview.

Marshall: I’m here with my great friend, Chester Elton. Chester is a leadership and culture thought leader, recognized by Global Gurus and many other organizations, and he’s just a good guy. A member of our 100 Coaches organization, Chester is always trying to make the world a better place.

Also, I’m proud to say that Chester is an advocate of our Stakeholder Centered Coaching process and he is being coached! Chester, can you share some reflections with us about how this process works, not only in a business setting, but also in a family setting?

Chester: Thank you Marshall! Yes, in our work in culture, we always say, “Look, don’t leave all these best practices at work. Take them home!” And, that’s what I love about Stakeholder Centered Coaching. You challenged us one time at a 100 Coaches event. You said, “Ask your kids, ‘How can I be a better dad?’” So, I did. I sent out a little note – we’ve got a WhatsApp string for our kids. And, I said, “Hey, I’ve been in this course and I just want to know how can I be a better dad?”

Some of my kids said, “Oh, you’re the world’s greatest dad. Don’t change a thing.” One of my children, Brendan, he’s our thinker, our engineer, said, “You know, dad. When you come out to visit me at school, you usually invite a bunch of other people and we do stuff and that’s always fun. The problem is at the end of the day, you’re tired, so when it’s one-on-one time with me, I don’t feel like I really get your time.”

Marshall: That’s great feedback!

Chester: Yes, it is. So he says, “When I’m home for the holidays and stuff, I’ll come visit you in your office and you’re always multitasking. I don’t really feel like I’ve got 100% of your attention.” So, I said, “You know what? I’m gonna overcome that.”

This was early in my stakeholder training, and I forgot the followup part! I changed my behavior and a couple months went to Brendan, and said, “Hey, Brendan, you challenged me to focus on you when we are together and not multitask. How am I doing?” And, Brendan said, “I don’t know. Let me think about that.” “Thank you,” I said.

I hadn’t checked in with him, so he hadn’t thought about it. Over the next couple of weeks, Brendan came to my office and I said, “Hey Brendan, you notice that when you come into the office, your dad closes his laptop and focuses on you? Did you notice that it was just you and me doing things?” He said, “Yeah.” I said, “You challenged me to change that. How am I doing?” He goes, “You know what, dad? You’re doing great.”

So it was this idea of checking in, following up, because if you just change your behavior, the perception doesn’t change. If you check in and ask for feedforward, there is a huge impact.

Marshall: Great! What I love about what you’re saying is, there is a difference between changing your behavior and that other person changing their perception. Because what really matters in life is not what we think we say, but what they hear.

Chester: Yes, absolutely! Thank you Marshall.

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3 Steps to Spreading Your Ideas in a Crowded Marketplace!

My wonderful friend Dorie Clark is a professor at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and the author of Entrepreneurial YouReinventing You and Stand Out, which was named the #1 Leadership Book of 2015 by Inc. magazine. A member of our 100 Coaches organization, Dorie is a former presidential campaign spokeswoman and the New York Times described her as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.”

In this week’s interview, Dorie, an expert at helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace, gives us her thoughts on how to get our ideas to spread. Below is an excerpt of our interview.

Marshall: I’m here with my wonderful friend and great thinker Dorie Clark. Dorie, is a world authority at helping people get their message across in a very crowded, tough marketplace. Dorie, I have a question: once you have developed your great idea, how do you get it to spread? There’s no use having a great idea if you’re not able to communicate it!

Dorie: That’s a great question Marshall and it’s something that I wrote about in my book, Stand Out. For the book, I interviewed dozens and dozens of thought leaders to break down and understand how they got their ideas out into the marketplace. I realized that there are three distinct steps to spreading your idea.

  1. Step one is a more internal process. It’s what I call building your network, because no one, despite the cultural myth, creates an idea on their own. Having a small group of trusted people who can help you sharpen your thinking, who can tell you which of your ideas are “good” and which are bad or need work, is critical. These people can also help you spread your ideas early on.
  2. Step two is what I call Building an Audience and that’s where you start sharing your idea publicly to get it out there. This is for people you don’t already know and could involve writing or speaking. It’s at this stage where you make sure new people hear the idea and you get feedback about the idea.
  3. The final stage is where things can really take off, because if you’re spreading your idea on your own, it can only go so far. In the final stage, you have your great idea, you have built your community, and that’s when other people start to take on the idea and say, “I’m really interested in this. I believe in this. I’m going to help spread it too.” You’ve begun to create that community by, for instance, having an online community, or doing meet up groups, like Sheryl Sandberg created Lean In groups that people could be part of and they became ambassadors for the idea. That’s how you create a movement.

Marshall: I love this! And just from a social media perspective, what you create is interaction. So what happens is, I respond to your idea, you respond to my response, social media. This creates interaction and the more interaction you create, the more people are exposed to your idea, the more people hear it, and the more likely it is to make a difference. So, I love your ideas. Thank you!

To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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What’s Your Big Idea?

 Dorie Clark is an expert at helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace. A wonderful friend of mine, Dorie is a member of our 100 Coaches organization and a fantastic thinker.

The author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, and an Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, Dorie is a former presidential campaign spokeswoman, and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

This week Dorie shares with us two suggestions for discovering our passion and how to turn that into a career. Below is an excerpt of our interview.

Marshall: I’m here with my wonderful friend, Dorie Clark. Dorie, you’re a great thinker, and I am so proud you are a member of our wonderful 100 Coaches organization. You are a world expert at helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace.

I’ve got a specific question. What if somebody has a broad idea of what they want to do or share, but they don’t have their unique niche, their personal big idea, that differentiator? What advice do you have?

Dorie: Thank you Marshall Great question.

There’s two things someone can do when they are trying to figure out their niche or their big idea. The first one at a basic level is “go bottom up”. Many people put pressure on themselves to define their idea from the top down What I recommend is to work bottom up. For instance, reach out to a variety of people that you admire in that field who you could interview for a blog or a podcast.

Through those interviews, you’re not only building your network and learning. You’re also discovering how the key people in the field think. Then you can begin to build your own ideas, and say to yourself, ‘Wait a minute, this part seems right, but I actually disagree with someone over here.’ It shows you where the holes are and you can fill them in with your own ideas. This canvassing people begins to suggest a path to you, it enables you to discover your path.

Marshall: This is a great idea Dorie. I can relate it to my own life. I’ve been privileged to spend time with some very smart people who were heroes of mine. They totally shaped my thinking. Then I could figure out who I was. Also, what I like it your method is you’re not copying. You’re becoming who you are. And, you’re incorporating what you’ve learned from people and what they’re doing and just as importantly what they’re not doing. So I love your idea. Thank you.

To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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What’s Your Passion?

Dorie Clark is an expert at helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace. A wonderful friend of mine, Dorie is a member of our 100 Coaches organization and a fantastic thinker.

The author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, and an Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, Dorie is a former presidential campaign spokeswoman, and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

This week Dorie shares with us two suggestions for discovering our passion and how to turn that into a career. Below is an excerpt of our interview.

Marshall: Dorie, you are a member of our 100 Coaches organization, a fantastic thinker, and a world’s authority in helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace.

So, I’ve got a question. You’re great at helping people get their message across. What if they don’t know what their passion is? You’ve got to have a passion about something to get your message out, right?

Dorie: That’s right Marshall! That’s an important starting point. For folks who aren’t sure what their passion is, I have a couple of suggestions.

  1. My first suggestion came from a friend of mine, the author James Altucher, and I think it is a really interesting experiment. Try this. If you were in a bookstore and it was a requirement that you had to read all the books in a certain section of the store, which section would you pick? This is an interesting way of beginning to think about your passion. What section would it be? Health? Business? Science fiction? Your answer shows the direction where your passion lies.
  2. The second suggestion, which I write about in my book Reinventing You, can be very useful for people. It often feels intimidating to find the “one right thing”, and I think for some of us it may be the wrong starting point. We might want to start instead on ruling things out. I wrote about a woman named Elizabeth who came up with a list of 10 professions that she was very interested in. Then she set about to attempt to disprove her interest in all of these areas. She did informational interviews, read books, and subscribed to magazines about the topics. She looked for pieces of information that would help her say, “Well no, actually, venture capital or real estate is not for me.” She was very thorough and meticulous in this research, so that she was whittled down a broad field of interests to what was right for her. This can be a lot less intimidating than trying to pick the exact right thing out of the gate.

Marshall: I love that! Instead of just figuring out what we want to do, which is important, you also need to ask, “What is it I don’t want to do?” Thank you!

 To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

I just turned 70 on March 20, 2019! Thanks to so many people for helping me have a great life! – Marshall

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Changing Others’ Perceptions of You

My wonderful friend Dorie Clark, a member of our 100 Coaches organization and a fantastic thinker, is an expert at helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace. The author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, Dorie is an Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, a former presidential campaign spokeswoman, and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

This week Dorie shares with us the key to getting from here to there is not just what we do, it’s how others perceive us. If they think we are a jerk, it’ll be hard for them to support our success. So, how do we change others’ perceptions of us? That’s our subject this week. Below is an excerpt from our interview.

Marshall: Dorie, one of the important things that you and I have talked about is changing perception, changing the way other people see us. We frequently hear people say, “It’s not fair. It’s not fair. I did this and it didn’t matter, get noticed, get rewarded.” Well, what we’re really complaining about is their perception of us, and we need to work on changing that perception. Please give our listeners some guidelines. What do you suggest might help them change others’ perceptions of them?

Dorie: This is a really important question. Thank you, Marshall.

If someone feels that their colleagues or the people around them aren’t seeing their full value, there’s a couple of reasonably quick and effective things that you can do.

First, ensure at a basic level that you always have a good answer to the question, “What are you working on right now?” This question comes up all the time. If you see someone at a networking event, they’ll often ask, “Marshall, what’s new? What have you been up to?” Most people haven’t planned the answer to that question. They say, “Oh, you know, same old thing. Nothing new.” This is a wasted opportunity. You know the question is going to be asked. Be prepared! Tell them that you are really excited because you are working on a project, book, idea about X, Y, and Z. Whatever it is, it plants the idea so that people understand.

Another thing that you can do is talked about quite a bit by Robert Cialdini, eminent psychologist, and Jeffrey Pfeffer of the Stanford School of Business. The basic idea is to recruit a trusted friend or colleague and become each other’s “wing man”. This way at an event, you can talk each other up at these networking events. For instance, if you feel a little nervous talking to people, your friend can help a bit and say, “Oh Marshall, did you know that Dorie just did X, Y, and Z?” And, the thing is not only is the information likely to be received well, you are helping each other.

Marshall: Brilliant ideas Dorie – Thank you!

 To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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2 Keys to Reinventing Yourself

Dorie Clark is a fantastic thinker in the area of helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace. She is a member of our 100 Coaches organization, the author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, and an Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business.

A former presidential campaign spokeswoman and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes, Dorie shares with us two keys to reinventing yourself in this week’s interview.

Marshall: Dorie, one thing you’re noted for is your ability in the concept of reinvention, helping people reinvent themselves. I’m sure many of our listeners right now are going through various phases of life where maybe it’s time for them to reinvent themselves.

Both of us are good friends with Whitney Johnson. Whitney talks about the importance of looking at that S curve when you’ve got to move to the next place, position, or job. What advice do you have for people listening to us about the concept of reinvention?

Dorie: Thank you Marshall. There are a couple of key points that I’ll mention. The first is around this question of self-disruption, because fundamentally there’s two different kinds of reinvention. There’s the slow and steady what I call the “lowercase r” reinvention and then there’s “capital R” reinvention where there’s some kind of a break or a disjunct in people’s lives and unfortunately that’s often a lot more traumatic. For instance, early in my career I got laid off from my job as a journalist. I didn’t have a plan B at that time, so I had to figure it out very quickly.

So, what I like to encourage people to do is to embrace the “lowercase r” reinvention and day-to-day small changes we can make that enable us to be ready if unexpected changes happen to us. That can include things like taking online courses or MOOCs and building effective networks. Many people only socialize with or know people at their own companies, yet if you build broader networks, if something happens then you have places to go and people to turn to outside of your company. So, these small steps really matter when it come to reinvention.

The second piece that I’ll mention when it comes to reinvention is around the question of changing other people’s perceptions of you. Oftentimes how other people see us change really lags behind how we see ourselves changing.

For instance, you might be want to move in a new direction, but other people still see you the way you were a few years ago. In this case, it’s really useful to think about public things that you can do that in some ways create social proof or a demonstration of your new identity. Social media can be really helpful here because even if you start to do small things like sharing articles regularly about the new field or new job you’re interested in, it begins to remind people of what you are doing now and want to do in the future. Over time, it seeps in and changes how people see you and the opportunities they think of to send your way.

Marshall: You know, one of the best researched principles of psychology, cognitive dissonance theory, is about this idea. We all see people in a manner that is consistent with our previous stereotype. I love what you’re saying about breaking that stereotype, and also about realizing that it is hard to do. It’s not easy to break the stereotype. Once I have an image of you, I am going to look for that. I love your idea of creating these events that reinforce not only for you, but for me the other person, that you are reinventing, you’re doing new things, you’re not who you used to be. Thank you!

To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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How to Create Effective Content Quickly

My wonderful friend Dorie Clark is recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press. She is the author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, and a world authority on helping people get their message out in a crowded marketplace, and she is one of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches.

Dorie is an Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, a former presidential campaign spokeswoman and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes. In this week’s interview, Dorie shares with us 3 keys to creating effective content quickly that will stand out in a crowded marketplace. Following is an excerpt from our interview.

Marshall: Dorie, you’re a world authority in the area of helping people get their message across a crowded marketplace. This can be tough because we’re under incredible time pressure today. We wonder, ‘How can I get this content out quickly enough?’

You have an amazing record, I think 250 articles in Forbes, 180 in Harvard Business Review. You crank it out. Give our listeners a couple of quick tips on how they can overcome writer’s block, how they can get over being stuck and get those good ideas out there.

Dorie: Absolutely Marshall. Of course, creating content is essential because in today’s economy we’re known for our ideas. People recognize that we’re good at what we do, so sharing that content publicly is key to it. I have developed a few strategies for how to develop content more quickly.

  1. A good starting place is to make notes. For instance, when you’re at a cocktail party or networking event, what are the questions that people keep asking you about your field or about your profession? You can just write them down. Keep a list. Try visiting the website Quora, a question and answer website where people have posted questions about your industry and use those questions as a starting off point of what to write about.
  2. The second thing that I like to suggest to people when it comes to creating effective content more quickly is to do a quick outline. You want three to five key points that you might say to the world about your subject, be it personal branding, effective marketing or whatever your field is. Create your bullet points and flush them out later.
  3. The third suggestion I have about rapidly creating content is to know who you’re writing for. I recommend that people create a target list of ideal publications to write for. Don’t just read, but really analyze the articles. Understand the topics in the publications and look for holes in what isn’t being covered. That will give you an angle to write pieces that will be accepted because they fit the type of topic they cover, but the angle is unique.

Marshall: I love what you’re saying. Peter Drucker always taught me the person who has the power to make the decision is going to make the decision. They are the customer. They don’t have to buy, you have to sell. And I love that what you’re suggesting is from a sales perspective. You are respecting the customer. You are doing your homework, studying what they need, and then making the presentation. It’s based on selling to their needs not you own. I love it!

 To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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3 Steps to Building Your Brand

Dorie Clark, world authority on helping people get their message out in a crowded marketplace, my wonderful friend and 100 Coach, shares with us three steps to building your brand in this week’s interview.

Dorie is recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press. She is the author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, and she is also an Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, a former presidential campaign spokeswoman and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes. Following is an excerpt from our interview.

Marshall: Dorie, you are a world’s authority at helping people get their message across in a very crowded marketplace. One thing that’s very important to me is the idea of personal brand. And, you know a lot about that! In just a couple minutes can you share some of your insights to our listeners on what they can do to build their own professional and personal brand?

Dorie: Absolutely, Marshall.

As we get into an increasingly globalized economy, it becomes much easier for companies to find someone who’s willing to do things more cheaply perhaps around the world, so the only defense against that for an individual or for a company for that matter, is to become known as being an expert in what they do. People are willing to pay more because they are going to you specifically because you are the expert. I wrote about this in my book, Reinventing You. And, it’s a three-step process to personal branding.

  1. The first step is getting clear on what your current brand is. When thinking of brand, a lot of people immediately ask themselves, “How do I create a brand?” But the truth is, you already have one. So, it’s getting a sense of what that brand is by canvassing your friends and colleagues and really understanding how you are perceived in the marketplace.
  2. The second step is to come up with a future vision for your brand. Where do you want to go and what skills or capabilities do you need to develop to get there? And then create an action plan towards that goal.
  3. The final step is what I call living out your brand. Oftentimes the discourse around reinvention, around personal branding, is this “one-and-done” phenomenon. But that’s not enough. We have to live our brands day-to-day, on a consistent basis, send that message in all the small steps we take along the way. This way you really get the message across in a way that lasts with other people.

Marshall: This is great! You know, I wrote a book with Sally Helgesen called How Women Rise. In our book, Sally came up with some really good thoughts. For instance, with women specifically sometimes they have more of a challenge with self-promotion, with promoting their own brand. Do you have any specific thoughts on how to get over that kind of phobia towards self-promotion?

Dorie: Absolutely, and I think you’re exactly right. I know so many talented women, who have no problem talking up their friends, colleagues, or companies, but when it comes to themselves, it’s a challenge.

One thing that I like to suggest, which I wrote about in a Harvard Business Review article, is to avoid adjectives and to think about nouns.

For instance, rather than introducing themselves with adjectives, like “I’m the best expert in personal branding,” or “I’m the leading attorney in New York City,” both of which are of course subjective adjectives and could potentially be perceived as bragging, try sticking to nouns. Stick to things that you have objectively accomplished, whether it’s winning a particular award or a particular role you are in. For instance, “I am the SVP of Finance at XXX company.” Or, “I am the President of IP of the local Bar Association.” These things convey expertise. They show implicitly that you have the credentials and that you are relating facts, not just putting a self-promotional gloss on yourself.

Marshall: I love it! Thank you!

  To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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How to Communicate in Times of Crisis

In this interview with my wonderful friend, Dorie Clark, world authority on helping people get their message out in a crowded marketplace, we talk about how leaders should communicate in times of crisis.

Author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand Out, Dorie is recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press. She’s also one of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches, Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, a former presidential campaign spokeswoman and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes.

Marshall: Dorie, you have a fascinating background. You’ve worked in the political scene. You’ve helped people deal with crisis and you teach this at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. Tell us what is it like for leaders to communicate in times of crisis.

Dorie: Thanks Marshall.

When leaders are faced with a crisis, it’s a tense situation. The normal communication of calmer times doesn’t work well. That’s because leaders have things coming at them and they can’t really plan things out. The key is to understand a few things.

  1. We often tend to over promise, pretend we know the answers in crisis. This doesn’t work. Have you heard the saying “the cover up is worse than the crime”? It’s true. And, this extends even to those who make honest mistakes by pushing just a little too far. In crisis, you want to say as much as you know, but no more than that, because you will get hammered if you do not state the facts.
  2. In crisis communication there are only 3 avenues you can take, really only three things you can say: The first is “I didn’t do it.” If you didn’t do it, just say that. That works. The second is, “I did it, but it was justified. Then you explain why you tried to change the narrative to make sense of it. The third is, “yes, we did, and we’re sorry.” If you have to do this, you want to say it as quickly as possible. If you start out denying, which is a human impulse, and it takes days, weeks, or months to get to the acknowledgement of the truth, unfortunately, your reputation is likely to become irreparably tarnished in the interim.

Marshall: Dorie, I love what you’re doing. It’s very related to our Stakeholder Centered Coaching process. We give leaders feedback, they get the good news, they find out what they need to change and when they have made mistakes. Then, they apologize and get to work. The sooner they do this, the better when it comes to change. So, I love what you’re doing. I think it helps organizations, and I think it helps individuals. It’s just a good way to look at living.

 To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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Finding Meaning in Your Job

Author of Entrepreneurial You, Reinventing You, and Stand OutDorie Clark is one of the Marshall Goldsmith 100 Coaches, and Adjunct Professor of Business Administration at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. A former presidential campaign spokeswoman and a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and Forbes, Dorie is recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press.

In our interview this week, she shares with us her fascinating story of how she found meaning in her work and how it might help you to do the same in today’s fast-moving world.

Marshall: I’m here with my wonderful friend Dorie Clark. Dorie is a world authority at helping people get their message across in a crowded marketplace – in other words Stand Out! Dorie, I love your background. It’s so unique. You went to undergraduate school and studied philosophy. You went to Harvard Divinity School. I think people would love to hear how your background helps you do your job now in working with corporate people?

Dorie: Thank you so much Marshall.

One of the things that inspired me to write my first book Reinventing You, is that diverse background I have. You see, part of what drew me to philosophy and the study of religion is the fact that it is how people make meaning in the world.

In contemporary society, the workplace now serves this function for many people. The question that we always ask first now is, “What do you do?” It is very unfortunate when people answer this question and their answer is something that they don’t care about, don’t feel engaged with.

So, part of what animates my work is helping to make sure that people are connecting, that they feel like they’re doing something truly meaningful with their lives. That they feel that they are fulfilling their purpose and helping their companies. That it is a win-win to work together. This all comes from that quest I have to know how people make meaning.

Marshall: I love what you’re doing. My daughter, Kelly Goldsmith, and I have done some research on what matters in life. We found that you really need to have simultaneous happiness and meaning.

Happiness — you love the process of what you are doing. And, meaning – it is exactly what you are talking about – you need to find a sense of purpose. What you do needs to matter to you, the outcome needs to matter to you.

So, I love what you are doing. I think it is great for companies. I also think it is great for individuals. Thank you very much!

 To learn more about Dorie, visit dorieclark.com. Build a following around your ideas, download your free 42-page Stand Out self-assessment to learn how.

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